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Repairing a Ravaged Tank PDF Print E-mail
Written by BMWVMCA NEWS   
Saturday, 14 January 2012

 

by Slamaway Hamfist

     This tank  came out of Germany via German Ebay. The seller made no attempt to hide the damage to the tank, which was made worse by attempts to repair it.

 

     The tank apparently went through what happens during a crash: The fork swings wildly from right to left, crushing the two forward parts of the tank.

 

 

     The attempted repair on the left side began with a hole drilled and something inserted and used to pull the dent out. Sometimes this method works well in auto body repair. It looks like the the repair person got frustrated and cut the sheet metal attempting to pull the crumpled steel out and brass weld it closed. What he (or she) ended up with was a mess.

 

     The story here begins after the brass has been burned off and the sheet metal reformed to come close to the original contours of the tank. The bottom of the tank had to be removed to allow access for a hand dolly.

 

     A patch needed to be made. Used was a piece cut out of a wrecked Ford Mustang fender, then peened to form the contour of the tank.

 

 

     Peening involves stretching the metal  to conform to whatever contour you want.  In this case, the center of the patch needed to be hammered in order to make the steel expand, forcing the patch to take on a concave form. If done carefully, the form can be made to match the contour of  the part being repaired.

 

 

     This procedure really does not take as long as you might think. The patch, from cutting the piece out of the Ford fender to making it ready to spot weld in place: 1/2 Hour.

 

     Note: Photo below shows the heat blued spots where the interference welder fused the patch inside the tank shell.

 

 

     With the hole closed, the shell gets TIG welded along all the splits, fully joining the parts of the damaged shell with the patch.

      The next step involves coating the inside of the tank with Caswell Epoxy, sealing the patch and the filling the empty space between the shell and the patch. 

Slamaway Hamfist

Pot Hole, OH

    

 

Last Updated ( Friday, 25 January 2013 )
 
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